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Have a new iPad? Download these apps first

by Dan Kricke

Already, titles including Kindle, New York Times for iPad and Evernote have released updates to take advantage of the 3.1 million pixels and unbelievable clarity of the newest iPad. Here is a pretty comprehensive of list of additional titles courtesy of Padadvance.com.

It’s not hard to imagine how some apps will improve with the new iPad thanks to Apple spelling out some of the enhancements to its iSuite of productivity apps. iPhoto ($4.99) for instance, is making its debut on the iPad just in time to take advantage of the improved Retina display and camera that offers pixel quality on par with the excellent iPhone 4S one. The improved camera, along with the editing options available in the iPhoto app, will make photography a much more attractive option for iPad owners.

iMovie ($4.99)  saw an upgrade that is sure to have amateur filmmakers squealing with delight. While users could previously edit and create a movie on the fly using the iMovie iPad app, they’ve now been given the ability to create trailers for their iPad epics. The expanded soundtrack control will come in handy, as will the ability to preview music and sound effects that were added with this update.

Not to be outdone, GarageBand ($4.99) is seeing a few nice iPad-inspired updates as well. If you’re prone to mistakes, the new note-by-note editing feature will be a welcome addition. That in-depth control will be even more useful after experimenting with GarageBand’s new ‘Jam Session’ feature, with lets you jam with up to three additional GarageBand users as the app automatically synchronizes the tempo and key of everyone’s instruments. Once the jam is over, the app collects everyone’s tracks and places them on your iPad for further mixing.

While all three of those apps have promised exciting iPad enhancements right out of the box, there are also apps that will be just as intriguing, if in less obvious ways. The stellar MLB.com At Bat app (Free) has been a hit in the iTunes App Store every season thanks to its connectivity with MLB.TV, providing baseball fans with a way to watch live games when regular TV is out of reach. But now with the iPad’s improved Retina display offering four times the pixels found in the iPad 2, watching MLB.TV via the MLB.com At Bat app might actually be preferable to watching it anywhere else, especially when you’re on-the-go.

Even social media apps like Tweetbot ($2.99) stand to improve thanks to the new iPad. While voice dictated messages have been a time saver on the iPhone for a while now, the new iPad will finally jump into the fray with voice dictation of its own. Now you can write emails, send tweets, and update your Facebook status using just a few taps and a clear speaking voice.

The new iPad’s hardware is a nice step up from the tech that ran the iPad 2, and these early updated apps are only a small indication of what developers will be able to improve upon. I’d say they’re off to a very promising start.